By Molly Dannenmaier

Dr. Selwyn O. Rogers, a surgeon and public health expert with credentials from Harvard, Vanderbilt and Temple schools of medicine, is the new vice president and chief medical officer for the Health System at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston. Rogers also will serve as assistant dean for clinical affairs in the School of Medicine. He will assume his duties Dec. 1, 2014.

"When we interviewed Dr. Rogers for the position, his passion for patient care, quality and service was very evident,” said Donna K. Sollenberger, UTMB executive vice president and chief executive officer for UTMB Health System.

Since 2012, Rogers has served as professor and chairman of surgery at Temple University School of Medicine. Before that, he was an associate professor of surgery at Harvard Medical School. He also served as director of the Center for Surgery and Public Health and as division chief for trauma, burns and surgical critical care at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and held academic appointments at Vanderbilt University School of Medicine and Meharry Medical College in Nashville.

 

Rogers graduated magna cum laude from Harvard when he received his bachelor’s degree in biology. He earned his medical degree from Harvard Medical School. He completed his surgical residency at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, including a research fellowship in surgical oncology and a clinical fellowship in surgical critical care. He also earned a master’s degree in public health from Vanderbilt University School of Medicine.

 

Rogers has received numerous awards and honors for his contributions to teaching and patient care. He is the author of more than 82 peer reviewed articles.

 

“He is a strong collaborator and an untiring advocate for patients and the elimination of health care disparities,” said Dr. Danny Jacobs, UTMB executive vice president, provost and dean of the School of Medicine. “He will be an excellent fit and addition to UTMB. We look forward to welcoming Dr. Rogers to UTMB and the Galveston community.”