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doctor observes a bed ridden patient

In 2001, Houston physician-philanthropist John P. McGovern donated $5 million to provide endowments for the William Osler Scholars: practicing physicians on the School of Medicine faculty selected based on their history of giving highly competent, humane, compassionate care and serving as outstanding teachers and role models for these qualities. Each Osler Scholar holds the honor for five years; together, they comprise the new John P. McGovern, M.D., Academy of Oslerian Medicine.

Bow Tie Social Club
Judith F. Aronson, M.D.
Bow Tie Social Club
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The Bowtie Social Club is a medical history interest group who meets once a month to enjoy a presentation on some topic of medical history. Discussions are preceded by a light dinner buffet with wine and mingling. Our faculty sponsor is Dr. Jack Alperin. The atmosphere is relaxed among students and faculty and discussion is encouraged following the presentation. Previous topics have ranged from the Discovery and Application of the X-ray to Ignaz Semmelweis and Puerperal Sepsis just to name a few. 

We'd like to invite you to our last Bow Tie Social Club gathering of the 2013-2014 academic year, to be held Wednesday, the 2nd of April at 6:00 pm in 8.206 Rebecca Sealy. This month's presentation will be “Making Meaning of Empathy: A Brief History of the Term and Findings of a Qualitative Study at UTMB" to be given by Sarah Baker from the School of Medicine.

The only requirement we have is that you must come clad in bowtie. If you don't have one, we encourage you to find a way of obtaining one, but if not, a few spares might be at hand. If you can't tie one, we'll show you how.

Please contact Will Green or Steve Dryden for specific details or to reserve a bow tie (wngreen@utmb.edu, scdryden@utmb.edu, 832-767-8913). We look forward to seeing you!

Kind regards,
Stephen Dryden, William Green, Ryan Nye and Rimma Osipov
The Bow Tie Social Club

Books to Bedside Project
Books to Bedside Project
Books to Bedside Project
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Books to Bedside Project
John Sealy Hospital boasts doctors on the cutting edge of medicine. They are well trained, competent, amiable, and focused on constantly improving their facilities and clinics. Driven by this passion for patient care, we of course would be remiss if we didn't ask ourselves, "What else can we do?" That is, we treat and medicate but do not possess magic wands to fast-forward the time lonely patients spend confined supinely to their beds, trying to convalesce, say, with old cable series reruns as their least mind-numbing filler. Television has its place for sure; reading, however, not only opens up new worlds, taking the patient far from the sterile and lonely hospital room, but it also stimulates the mind and fosters pride in one's mental capacities. When the subject is purposefully selected–a Louis L'Amour Western or a picture book of Texas wildflowers, it can even be a restorative, therapeutic tool. Hospitals have embraced and practiced this (bibliotherapy) for nearly a century, and its efficacy as a therapy is documented, which also makes it a boon, under the UTMB mission, to the practice of evidence-based medicine.

Our hospital, however, has no such program.

Outside of a small and mostly unknown collection of donated books that Volunteer Services has in storage to hand out to interested patients, the infirm at John Sealy must provide their own books and magazines. As a result, they may not be utilizing an almost universally usable tool toward recovery whose value physicians in nearly every specialty, from pediatrics to psychiatry, have recognized.

Our long-term objectives are to have an established program in the hospital that is well known to patients and staff and can provide books with a variety of reading levels and subjects to all patients with ease and efficiency. We envision B2B as a unique, rewarding and therapeutic part of the patient experience at John Sealy Hospital. This project will recognize the shared interests of the university and its surrounding community in promoting a vibrant and supportive environment by also encouraging support from non-hospital individuals who are looking for ways to get involved in the community. Volunteers will help promote UTMB's hallmark patient-first philosophy and offer a personal, compassionate touch to the delivery of healthcare.

The goals of the project are as follows:
  1. To better serve our patients via a friendlier healing environment that gives them free and better access to more than 4,000 books already donated by our community.
  2. To encourage reading in our patient population.
  3. To encourage students to interact with patients through the personal delivery of books to patients.

Plans are currently underway to develop this library which is part of the overall renovation of the lobby of John Sealy Hospital.

John P. McGovern Hall of Medical History
John P. McGovern Hall of Medical History
John P. McGovern Hall of Medical History
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The John P. McGovern Hall of Medical History consists of 12 statues representing outstanding figures in the field of medicine. This exhibit is a gift of Houston allergist John P. McGovern. One of his absorbing avocations has been the history and philosophy of medicine, an interest made evident by his generous gift to UTMB.

These works by medical sculptor Doris Appel, who selected the individuals to depict, provide a journey through medical history, from 2600 B.C.E., the time of the Egyptian Imhotep, to the turn of the 20th century, when Marie Curie discovered radium. A student of the School of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts and the School of Art of Boston University, sculptor Doris Appel confirmed her work to the interpretation of medical history and received encouragement from such luminaries as Albert Einstein and medical historian Arturo Castiglione. Her sculptures appear in libraries, universities and medical institutions across the country.

Virtual tour of the Hall of Medical History
( to use, click your mouse and drag to swivel the view around the Hall )

Old Red Anatomical Museum
professor teaching a class
"Old Red" Medical Museum
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A new museum in "Old Red": telling UTMB's story. The mission of the "Old Red" Medical Museum (ORMM) is to further the understanding of health, disease, and health sciences education.

Dr. William Keiller teaching a class
Dr. William Keiller
UTMB's first professor of anatomy
September 2008: Hurricane Ike forces the closing of "Old Red" due to equipment damage on lower floor (no structural damage). Gross anatomy lab on the 3rd floor had already become overcrowded due to increased class size. A new lab was needed for entering class in fall 2008.Thus the original room used for anatomy teaching when UTMB opened in 1891 became vacant.

UTMB's unique collection of about 2000 historic anatomic and pathological wet specimens survived intact, but are in constant danger of deterioration if not carefully maintained. There is strong interest in preserving the architectural landmark, Ashbel Smith Building, and its historic amphitheatre. Hence conditions are ideal for creation of a museum focused on the history of teaching health sciences, including anatomy. Currently plans are underway to bring this project to fruition.

"Old Red" Medical Museum Task Force and Heritage Committee
UTMB's "Old Red" Medical Museum Task Force and Heritage Committee have held monthly meetings over the past five years. The Task Force and Heritage Committee, created by the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine and the Institute for the Medical Humanities, is exploring the possibility of founding a new medical museum on the top floor of "Old Red."

Paula Summerly, PhD, Research Project Manager for the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine, is currently researching and cataloguing UTMB's rich medical heritage collections. (email: pasummer@utmb.edu)

The earliest specimens date from 1896, however the bulk of the collections date to the 1930s. The specimens along with the vast medical memorabilia collections held by the Truman G. Blocker, Jr. History of Medicine Collections at UTMB could form the nucleus of the future medical museum.

UTMB's former Museums
of Anatomy and Pathology
Galveston Daily News, 1922
Galveston Daily News, 1922
At the opening of the University of Texas Medical Department in the summer of 1891, there were two museums in "Old Red" - one anatomical, the other pathological. The anatomy museum, located on the third floor, was curated by Professor William Keiller. The pathology museum, on the floor below, was the work of Allen J. Smith, UTMB's first Professor of Pathology.

Syphilitic Osteitis of the Skull
Syphilitic Osteitis of the Skull (Detail)
Specimen from former Pathology Museum
The museums grew to achieve local and national recognition and were praised in Abraham Flexner's report, Medical Education in the United States and Canada (1910). The museums were also open to the general public, which was highly unusual for the period. By 1925, the museums expanded and were rehoused in the New Laboratory Building (later renamed the Keiller Building). Over the subsequent decades, however, due to changes in medical education, the museums became marginalized and largely fell out of use.

Osler Club
Osler Club
Osler Club
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The Osler Club convenes bimonthly and attendance open to all members of the UTMB community. Presentations last 40 50 minutes followed by 10 15 minutes of Q & A and discussion. A light buffet supper is then served with continuation of discussion. CME credits awarded for attendance and meetings last approximately 2 hours.

The next meeting is to be held on Tuesday, May 27th from 5:30-7:30pm at the Open Gates Conference Center, 2419 Sealy Avenue. Patricia Beach, MD, Scholar in the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine and Professor in the Department of Pediatrics, will be presenting, “Sharing Osler’s Character” which will be followed by Rachel M. Pearson, MD/PhD Student and an Osler Student Scholar in the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine, who will be discussing, “Can Empathetic Physicians have Aequanimitas? The Roman Roots of Oslerian Practice.”

A light buffet supper will be served.  Admission is free, but space is limited.  Reservations are advised.  For reservations, or to register for CME credit, contact Rosemary Lindley, ext. 79680 or mcacadem@utmb.edu.

Osler Oration
Osler Oration
Osler Oration
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The annual Osler Oration is held on or about July 6, William Osler's birthday.

The thirteenth annual Osler Oration celebrating Sir William Osler's 165th birthday and the 2014 recipient of the John P. McGovern Lifetime Achievement Award in Oslerian Medicine, Dr. Leonard E. Swischuk, will be held on Friday, July 11, 2014, 6:00 p.m. at the Grand 1894 Opera House (2020 Postoffice Street Galveston, Texas).

The event will feature the recognition of the recipients of the Excellence in Clinical Teaching Awards, induction of the Osler Student Scholars, John and Mary Ann Stobo Award, and the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine Student Award, as well as reading of the winning essays for the Practice of Medicine Essay Award.

RSVP by June 27 to Rodemary Lindley at (409) 747-9680 or mcacadem@utmb.edu.

Oslerian Pathology Project
Osler conducting a demostration
Oslerian Pathology Project
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The Oslerian Pathology Project is a collaboration between fourth year medical students taking a Humanities Selective course and Dr. Judy Aronson, Osler Scholar and Director of the UTMB Autopsy Service. The Oslerian Pathology Project has several components.

» Read about the complete Oslerian Pathology Project.

Pedi Wall Project
a colorful tile wall done by children
Pedi Wall Project
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Children's Hospital Wall Project

Sir William Osler, the founder of modern medicine, believed not only in the importance of a sound scientific understanding of the human body, but also in the importance of developing a strong professional relationship with each patient. Just as Osler brought residents and medical students to the bedside to learn medicine, The Osler Project brought UTMB students to the bedside to exercise their minds and spirits in humanistic efforts and united them in the common interest of Osler's compassion. As Osler said in an address to the students of the Albany Medical College in 1899, "Be careful when you get into practice to cultivate equally well your hearts and your heads."

Pedi Wall Project
Pedi Wall Project
The idea of The Osler Project was developed in the fall of 2005 during a brainstorming session for possible volunteer activities by Osler Student Scholars and the pilot POM-1 Osler Student Society group. Their aim was to give pediatric patients an activity to make their stay in the hospital more positive and to get UTMB students involved with patients outside f academic interactions. With the help of Drs. Mark Holden and Judith Aronson, Scholars in the John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine, along iwth artist Julie Weldon and the Pediatric Child Life Program, The Osler Project decided to create a beach-scene mosaic from ceramic tiles painted by pediatric patients and their families. Individual kits with all the necessary supplies to paint a tile were distributed to patients, and students assisted and/or painted with the children in their free time.

The project was completed in the summer of 2008, just weeks prior to hurrican Ike, and is proudly on display in the first floor entrance of Children's Hospital.

» "The Beach" mosaic finds new home.

Sir William Osler's Name That Book Competition
Sir William Osler's Name That Book Competition
Sir William Osler's
Name That Book Competition
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In 2010 Greg Valentine, Osler Student Scholar class of 2012, and Sean Paschall, Osler Student Scholar class of 2013 launched "Sir William Osler's Name That Book" program for third and fourth grade Galveston elementary school students. The program strives to instill a passion for self-directed learning through reading and mentoring from medical students. In the program's first year, four Galveston elementary schools (Oppe Elementary, Early Childhood University, Parker Elementary, Morgan Elementary) participated in the program.

With support from the Galveston Independent School District, every week medical students would go out to each school and worked with the students to read the 35 books for the February competition. The program culminated in a district wide competition in which seven teams competed to "Name That Book" from quotes pulled from the books they had been reading with their mentors. The 2010-2011 champions were Oppe Elementary, who had the honor of having their school's name engraved on a traveling trophy.

For the 2011-2012 year Sean Paschall and Roxi Radi, Osler Student Scholar class of 2014, expanded the program to an additional school: Odyssey Academy. They also developed a website of resources for the medical students and parents of participating elementary students. After a 30 minute instant-death overtime round, Parker Elementary won the competition and will host the traveling trophy until 2013.

» Name That Book 2014

 

Visiting Osler Scholar
Osler Oration
Visiting Osler Scholar
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Description of Grant

The John P. McGovern Academy of Oslerian Medicine (the Academy) invites clinical departments at UTMB to submit requests for financial support to provide for an outstanding clinician teacher to spend a 5-day work week on campus as a Visiting Osler Scholar (VOS) in the department to which the grant is awarded. The person selected as the VOS would be expected to participate in the clinical teaching activities of the department: examples include making ward rounds and attending clinics with students and house staff (within the limitations of state medical licensure), leading small group conferences with trainees, and other clinical activities particular to the host department. The schedule should include an opportunity for the VOS and a representative from the host department to meet with the Osler Scholars for an informal discussion regarding teaching clinical medicine. Proposals that include participation by the VOS with another department or group focused on teaching would be welcome.

» Read the complete Visiting Osler Scholar Request for Proposal.

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